Lewis (musician)

Lewis

Birth name
Randall A. Wulff

Also known as
Lewis Baloue, Randy Duke

Origin
Canada

Instruments
Guitar, vocals

Years active
1980s–present

Labels
Light in the Attic

Randall A. Wulff, better known by his stage name Lewis, and also known as Lewis Baloue and Randy Duke, is a Canadian singer and musician. He released a number of albums in the 1980s, but did not become widely known until they were re-released in 2014.

Contents

1 Early and personal life
2 Career
3 Discography
4 References

Early and personal life[edit]
Lewis’ family live in British Columbia but he is estranged from them; in August 2014 his brother stated that he had not seen Lewis since 2007.[1] His father and uncle had lost touch with him some years previously.[2]
During the recording process of his 1980s albums Lewis worked as a stockbroker,[3] and lived in Calgary.[2] He lived with his girlfriend in an apartment with all-white furniture.[2][3]
Career[edit]
Lewis recorded two albums in 1983 and 1985 (L’Amour and Romantic Times) that were mostly forgotten until a record collector discovered L’Amour in an Edmonton flea market. They were both re-released by Seattle-based record label Light in the Attic in 2014.[1]
L’Amour was recorded in Los Angeles in 1983.[2][4] Lewis disappeared soon after the photoshoot by Edward Colver for the album cover, after his cheque to Colver bounced.[1][3]
Romantic Times was originally released in 1985 under the ‘Lewis Baloue’ pseudonym.[5] An original copy of the album sold on eBay in 2014 for $2,000.[6]
Two further albums – Love Ain’t No Mystery (recorded under the ‘Randy Duke’ pseudonym) and Hawaiian Breeze were also released by different record labels in 2014 and 2015 respectively.[7][8]
Under a different pseudonym, Lewis is also believed to have recorded a number of “very soft, religious music” albums in Vancouver in the mid-2000s which were never released.[1][3]
In 2014 Lewis stated that he was continuing to perform music, but that he was not interested in his earlier releases.[9]
Discography[edit]

Original release
Re-release
Title

1983
2014
L’Amour

1985
2014
Romantic Times

Unknown
2014
Love Ain’t No Mystery

Unknown
2015
Hawaiian Breeze

References[edit]

^ a b c d “The mystery of Canadian musician ‘Lewis'”. CBC. August 1, 2014. Retrieved January 25, 2015. 
^ a b c d Charles Taylor (July 6, 2014). “Let Me Whisper in Your Ear: On the mysterious Lewis”. LA Review of Books. Retrieved January 25, 2015. 
^ a b c d Rob

Christmas Creek Airport

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Christmas Creek Airport

IATA: CXQ
ICAO: YCRK

Summary

Airport type
Public

Location
Christmas Creek Station, Western Australia

Elevation AMSL
125 ft / 38 m

Coordinates
18°53′S 125°55′E / 18.883°S 125.917°E / -18.883; 125.917Coordinates: 18°53′S 125°55′E / 18.883°S 125.917°E / -18.883; 125.917

Map

YCRK

Location in Western Australia

Runways

Direction
Length
Surface

m
ft

1,100
3,609

For the airport servicing Fortescue Metals Group’s Christmas Creek mine, see Graeme Rowley Aerodrome.
Christmas Creek Airport (IATA: CXQ, ICAO: YCRK) is an airport serving Christmas Creek Station, in the Australian state of Western Australia.[1]
It is located in the Shire of Derby-West Kimberley, one of the four local government areas in the Kimberley Region of northern Western Australia.
Facilities[edit]
The airport resides at an elevation of 125 ft (38 m) above sea level. It has one runway that is 1,100 m (3,609 ft) in length.[1]
See also[edit]

Western Australia portal

List of airports in Western Australia

References[edit]

^ a b Airport information for CXQ / YCRK at Great Circle Mapper.

2. Aerodrome information. Airservices Australia http://www.airservicesaustralia.com/aip/pending/ersa/FAC_YCHK_10-Nov-2016.pdf

v
t
e

Airports in Western Australia

Public airports

Albany
Balgo Hill
Broome
Bunbury
Busselton
Carnarvon
Christmas Creek
Cue
Cunderdin
Derby
Esperance
Fitzroy Crossing
Forrest
Geraldton
Halls Creek
Jandakot
Jurien Bay
Kalbarri
Kalgoorlie-Boulder
Karratha
Katanning
Kununurra
Lake Gregory
Laverton
Leinster
Leonora
Manjimup
Margaret River
Meekatharra
Morawa
Mount Magnet
Mullewa
Newman
Norseman
Onslow
Paraburdoo
Perth
Port Hedland
Ravensthorpe
Rottnest Island
Shark Bay
Springvale
Tom Price
Warburton
Wiluna
Wyndham

Private airports

Argyle
Argyle Downs
Barimunya
Barrow Island
Bellevue
Boolgeeda
Brockman
Bronzewing
Coondewanna
Darlot
Forrestania
Fortescue Dave Forrest
Golden Grove
Graeme Rowley
Granny Smith
Jundee
Kambalda
Karara
Lake Johnston
Lawlers
Mount Keith
Mungalalu Truscott
Murray Field
Murrin Murrin
Nifty
Plutonic
Shay Gap
Solomon
Southern Cross
Sunrise Dam
Telfe

Richard Strachey

Sir Richard Strachey

Sir Richard Strachey

Born
24 July 1817

Died
12 February 1908 (1908-02-13) (aged 90)

Allegiance
United Kingdom

Service/branch
 British Indian Army

Rank
Lieutenant General

Battles/wars
First Anglo-Sikh War

Awards
Knight Grand Commander of the Order of the Star of India

Lieutenant General Sir Richard Strachey GCSI FRS (1817–1908), British soldier and Indian administrator, third son of Edward Strachey and grandson of Sir Henry Strachey, 1st Baronet was born on 24 July 1817, at Sutton Court, Stowey, Somerset. From Addiscombe Military Seminary he passed into the Bengal Engineers in 1836,[1] and was employed for some years on irrigation works in the North-Western Provinces. So many members of the family were in the Indian government that sarcastic mentions were made of the “Government of the Stracheys”.[2]

Contents

1 Life and work
2 See also
3 Notes
4 Other sources
5 External links

Life and work[edit]
Strachey served in the First Anglo-Sikh War of 1845–46, and was at the battles of Aliwal and Sobraon, was mentioned in dispatches, and received a brevet-majority.
In 1848, with J. E. Winterbottom, he entered Tibet to explore Lakes Manasarovar and Rakshastal, which his brother Henry Strachey had visited in 1846. In 1849, the two brothers briefly re-entered Tibet by following the Niti Pass out of Garhwal.[3]
From 1858 to 1865 he was chiefly employed in the public works department, either as acting or permanent secretary to the government of India, and from 1867 to 1871 he filled the post of director-general of irrigation, then specially created.
During this period the entire administration of public works was reorganised to adapt it to the increasing magnitude of the interests with which this department has had to deal since its establishment by Lord Dalhousie in 1854. For this reorganisation, under which the accounts were placed on a proper footing and the forest administration greatly developed, Strachey was chiefly responsible. His work in connection with Indian finance was important. In 1867 he prepared a scheme in considerable detail for decentralising the financial administration of India, which formed the basis of the policy afterwards carried into effect by his brother Sir John Strachey under Lord Mayo and Lord Lytton.

Lady Strachey

He left India in 1871, but in 1877 he was sent there to confer with the government on the purchase of the East Indian railway, and was then selected as pr

Intermediate host

A secondary host or intermediate host is a host that harbors the parasite only for a short transition period, during which (usually) some developmental stage is completed. For trypanosomes, the cause of sleeping sickness, humans are the intermediate host, while the tsetse fly is the definitive host, given that it has been shown that reproduction occurs in the insect. Cestodes (tapeworms) and other parasitic flatworms have complex life-cycles, in which specific developmental stages are completed in a sequence of several different hosts.
As the life cycles of many parasites are not well understood, sometimes the “more important” organism is arbitrarily defined as definitive, and this designation may continue even after it is determined to be incorrect. For example, sludge worms are sometimes considered “intermediate hosts” for whirling disease, even though it is known that the parasite causing the disease reproduces sexually inside them.[1]
In Trichinella spiralis, the roundworm that causes trichinosis, a host has both reproductive adults in its digestive tract and immature juveniles in its muscles, and is therefore considered both an intermediate host and a definitive host.
See also[edit]

Host (biology)

References[edit]

^ Maria E Markiw. “Salmonid Whirling Disease”. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Archived from the original on July 10, 2004. 

VXR

VXR

Product type
Automotive industry

Owner
Vauxhall

Country
United Kingdom

Introduced
2007 (VX Racing)
2004 (VXR)

Related brands
VX Racing

Markets
United Kingdom
Australia (2006-09)

Website
vxr.co.uk

VXR is the branding for the high-performance trim specification, used since 2004 for models in many of Vauxhall’s car range in the United Kingdom.
Holden also uses the VXR badge for some of its high-performance cars such as the Astra VXR and Insignia VXR.
European-sourced VXR models are produced and developed by Opel Performance Center, a division of Opel. The VXR8 is produced and developed by Holden of Australia’s HSV division. The VXR brand is closely linked to VX Racing, Vauxhalls British Touring Car Championship team, and the VXR versions of the cars are race track-styled models, with high performance capabilities.

Contents

1 History
2 Current VXR models
3 Former VXR models
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

History[edit]
The VX Racing name was first used in 2003 instead of Vauxhall Motorsport, taking part in the BTCC with cars prepared by Triple 8 Race Engineering.
The VXR badge was first launched in the summer of 2004 at the British Motor Show with enhanced consumer versions of the Monaro and VX220.[1] In 2005 the VXR range included the Astra VXR and subsequently Zafira, Vectra, Corsa, Insignia and Meriva versions.
It was launched following discussions with the Directors (K Grice, P Marshall and N Reed) and several Regional Organisers of the Vauxhall Sports Car Club – at the time the official club for owners and enthusiasts of Vauxhall performance models[2] to replace the GSi branding (which itself replaced the GTE label) which was previously used on top-end high-performance models.
Shortly after the introduction of the VXR brand, a dedicated website and discussion forum VXRonline was set up by the Directors of the Vauxhall Sports Car Club to provide technical assistance, advice, meetings and events for all owners and enthusiasts of the VXR models.
Current VXR models[edit]
Corsa VXR

Launched 2015
1.6i Turbo 16v engine A16LER (uprated from previous Corsa VXR)
205 brake horsepower (153 kW)
LED running lights and bi-xenon headlights
VXR exterior and interior styling
Twin Remus exhaust
0-62 mph (100 km/h) 6.5secs
Maximum speed 143 mph (230 km/h)
17″ alloys (optional 18″)
ESP stability control system
Koni dampers
Traction Control
Heavily bolstered Recaro bucket seats and VXR badging
Intellilink audio

Hakob Pilosyan

Hakob Pilosyan

Medal record

Men’s Weightlifting

Representing  Armenia

European Championships

2001 Trenčín
-94 kg

Hakob Pilosyan (born July 7, 1973 in Gyumri, Armenia) is an Armenian weightlifter.
Pilosyan qualified to compete at the 2000 Summer Olympics, but didn’t due to illness.[1]
References[edit]

^ “Hakob Pilosyan”. Sporting Armenia. Retrieved 23 February 2013. 

External links[edit]

Hakob Pilosyan at Lift Up

This biographical article relating to weightlifting in Europe is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e